Business, Relationships, and Running

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*REPOST FROM 12/5/12*

Thinking about time management one night, I soon realized the similarities between a relationship and a business. Both take a huge initial investment of time in the beginning, but require less and less “work” as time goes on. As in, you’re no longer trying to learn everything about each other or trying to do everything in your business. You have learned to trust and delegate. Thus, it becomes more about maintenance. Both, relationships and businesses, go through stages. Both have a beginning and an end; however, if you are lucky you will build something that will last a lifetime.

One thing I have realized is it doesn’t really matter how many failed relationships or failed businesses you have been a part of. It only takes one special person or one successful business to change your life.

Too many people settle too early. Settling is easy; to continue to put yourself out there and take chances is hard. Every time you reach out to do something new, you run the risk of losing what you have already accomplished. Every time you end a bad relationship, you run the risk of being lonely, and I’m sure most would agree that being lonely is hard. However, I’m also a believer that anything worth having is hard to obtain. As cliche as this sounds, you’ll know when it’s the right one.

I recently finished a half-marathon, and I’m training for a full marathon in April. It was an experience that I will never forget because I learned so much from it. One of the things I have learned was that once you cross that finish line, everything was worth it. The five to six months of training, the 20-30 miles each month, it was all worth it. It was worth the 2+ hours of exhausting, sweat-dripping pain I endured throughout the run. In fact, it made it the journey that much better. All of the work and training became trials and tribulations in my small “story” to the finish line. If the race had turned out to be an easy run, I guarantee you that it would not have meant as much as it did. The fact that I felt like I could collapse at any moment during the last two to three miles made crossing that finish line memorable.

I kept thinking to myself, if I had given up at any time during the race, I would have never been able to experience that. All of my pain and struggles would remain just that, just pain and struggles. So, if you ever feel like you just can’t handle it any more, or that you’re in unbearable pain, find a reason to keep going because once you cross that line, all of that pain will make it that much sweeter.

I do the things I do because I see the running, the reading, the self-analyzing, the critical thinking, and self-development as part of a bigger race. Bigger than a marathon, a run for life.

 

The way I see it.

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The way I see it is…it’s like running towards a destination far off in the distance. Imagine a blinking light far off in the distance. You don’t know the exact route, the exact path you’re going to take, or everything you’re going to come across on your journey. However, as long as you have a clear vision of your goal. You can get there. You just have to prepare yourself mentally and physically for the challenges along the way.

People ask, “What if it’s not possible to run to the place you desire?” It’s true, there are places you can’t run to because of physical limitations (i.e. running across the ocean) or simply just not possible (i.e. running to the stars). That’s the realm of the real dreamers. People like Tesla, Thomas Edison, and the Wright Brothers, people who sought to do things that were beyond the level of comprehension of their time. I’m not there yet; I hope to be one day.

I’m simply trying to run to a place so many other people have been, a place where people with far less opportunity than me have been. So, I know it’s possible. It might not be the well-worn path. It might be full of hardship and adversity, but I love a challenge.

I don’t know the purpose of life. I don’t think anyone undisputedly knows the purpose of life. If you think you do, I’m all ears, but until then, I’ll give myself one because I hate standing still. My purpose, my goal, my reason for being is to make the world a better place because I existed. I’m not saying I’m a saint; I’m not. I am human like everyone else. I have desires, needs, and greed. However, what I recently realized through my reading is, great people are humans too. I used to hold them on this pedestal. I thought that in order to be great, you had to be almost godlike. You don’t. Your personality and character trait doesn’t dictate the good you can do. From what I read, Steve Jobs was a total asshole. He was manipulative, downright mean, and yet he was able to make a huge impact on the world and touch millions of people.

I’m not telling you this because I condone “character flaws”. I don’t. I believe you should strive to be the best person you can be morally. However, it is more of a reminder that even when flawed, we can do amazing things.